GED® Score Change FAQs for Students

The passing score for the GED® test is now 145 instead of 150. What this means for you:



DETAILED GED® SCORE CHANGE FAQs

I heard that GED Testing Service changed the passing score for the GED® test. What are the current score levels?
The GED® test score levels are:

How are these score levels different from the old ones?

Will this change affect students in every state where the GED® test is available?
Most states have adopted and implemented the score change, but a few states are still in the process of adopting or implementing this change. If you are testing in one of these states that hasn’t yet adopted the change, don’t worry. Simply continue testing as you normally would. This change has to go through a formal approval process that will take some extra time. Click here for specific details on the score changes in your state.

Why did you change the GED® test passing score?
The current score levels are the best representation of the full range of abilities of today's high school graduates, whether the person is meeting minimum graduation standards or ready for college and beyond. We completed an extensive analysis of GED® test taker and graduate data and consulted with state policy makers and elected officials to determine this score change.

I scored between 145-149 on a GED® test subject in the past. What does the score change mean to me?
If you took a GED® test subject between January 1, 2014, and March 1, 2016, and earned a score between 145 - 149 on that subject, your records have been automatically updated to show that you passed that test. 

If because of this change, you’ve now passed all four GED® test subjects, then congratulations - you’ve earned your GED® credential and should receive your transcript and diploma from your state. Click here to see transcript timelines for each state.

I passed all four test subjects and haven’t gotten my diploma or transcript yet. What should I do?
Each state is responsible for processing transcripts and diplomas for graduates in their state. As a result, each state has a different process and timeline for getting the transcripts and diplomas of newly credentialed students out. Click here to see more information on when you can expect your transcript and diploma from your state.

What if I took my GED test subject in different states? For instance, if I took my Science test in one state, and then took the other three test subjects in another state? What state will issue my transcript and diploma?
Your transcript and diploma will be issued by the state in which you last tested.

I scored between 145-149 on a GED® test subject in the past, but retook the test and passed it at 150 on my second try. Do I get a refund for my test retakes?
No, GED Testing Service waives its fees in order to provide up to two free retakes per test subject. Any fees that you may have paid for retakes would have been administrative charges by the testing centers and/or the states, which are not under the authority of GED Testing Service.

I scored below 145 on a GED® test subject in the past. What does the score change mean to me?
If you scored below 145 on a GED® test subject, then the score change doesn’t affect you. However, since the minimum passing score is now 145 instead of 150, you have a better chance of passing when you take the test next time. Keep studying and move forward with scheduling a retake.

Does this score change affect me if I’ve already passed the test?
Possibly - GED Testing Service has updated the records of all test-takers since January 2014 with the new score levels. You may now have scored at the GED® College Ready level (165 - 174), or you may become eligible for college credits by scoring at the GED® College Ready + Credit level (175 - 200). 

I already passed the GED® test but have now earned a score in the GED® College Ready or GED® College Ready + Credit score levels. What should I do next?
Congratulations on passing the GED® test! If you now qualify for the GED® College Ready or College Ready + Credit score levels, your scores have been updated in the “My Scores” section of your MyGED® account.

What does the College Ready score mean?
If you’ve earned the College Ready score on your GED® test, it means that you likely have the skills to start college-level courses. Depending on the school or program you apply to, you may not have to take a placement test or any remedial (non-credit) courses in college, which will save you money when working on a college certificate or degree. Talk to your college’s admissions office to learn more about their policies.

What does the College Ready + Credit score mean?
If you’ve earned the College Ready + Credit score on your GED® test, it means that you have already demonstrated some of the same skills that are taught in college-level courses. Depending on the school or program you apply to, you may be eligible for up to 3 credits in Math, 3 credits in Science, 3 credits in Social Studies, and up to 1 credit in English, which will save you money and time when working towards your college certificate or degree. Learn more about the ACE credit recommendations here.

Has the score level for the GED Ready® practice test changed?
Yes, since the GED Ready® practice test is used to predict performance on the actual test, the score level for the GED Ready® has been updated to correspond with the passing score change on the actual test.

I recently took the GED Ready® practice test – does this score change affect me?
If you’ve already taken the GED Ready® practice test, then your practice test scores have been updated in the “My Scores” section of your MyGED® account. But remember, you should take a GED® test subject within 60 days of earning “Likely to Pass” on your practice test for the practice test predictions to be most accurate.

I heard that the Social Studies test subject no longer has an extended response (essay). Is this true?
Yes, as of March 1, 2016, we eliminated the extended response from the Social Studies test subject. As a result, the test is now 70 minutes long (instead of 90 minutes). Students will still write an extended response for the Reasoning Through Language Arts test subject.

Why did you remove the Social Studies extended response (essay)?
The Social Studies extended response and the Reasoning Through Language Arts extended response both measure the same skills. We decided it was a better use of your time to focus on writing one extended response since the second extended response didn’t demonstrate any new skills that you wouldn’t also show on the RLA test.