2002 Newfoundland and Labrador

Use the links below to find out about your local testing center rules and requirements. If you’re still looking for information, visit your jurisdiction’s GED® testing program website to learn more.

Computer vs. Pencil and Paper

Province Requirements

Price & Payment

Registration & Scheduling

 

Test Scores

Retake Policies

GED® Test Credential

Language Versions

 

Computer vs. Pencil and Paper (top)

Can I take the GED® test on computer in Newfoundland and Labrador?

Yes, Newfoundland and Labrador offers the GED® test on computer at select testing centers.

Find a center in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Why don’t all provinces offer both computer and paper exams?

GED Testing Service is currently introducing the GED® test on computer to all the provinces that offer the test. But not every province offers the GED® test on computer yet. 

Newfoundland and Labrador offer the GED® test on computer.  

Can I switch between paper and computer testing? Can I combine them?

Newfoundland and Labrador allows you to combine scores between the GED® test on computer and the pencil-and-paper version of the test. However, once you start on computer, Newfoundland and Labrador requires you continue on the computer version. 

Province/Territory Requirements (top)

How old do I need to be to take the test (without exceptions)?

You have to be 19 years old to take the GED® test in Newfoundland and Labrador.

I’m underage. What do I need to do to take the test?

In Newfoundland and Labrador, you need to be 19 years old to take the GED® test. There are rare exceptions when an 18-year-old test-taker would be approved.

Are there any residency requirements to take the test?

In Newfoundland and Labrador, you must be a citizen of Canada to take the GED® test.

The closest testing center is in a different province.  Can I take the exam there?

Some areas allow people to take the GED® test even if they do not live there and others don’t. You’ll need to check the residency requirement for the province that you’re interested to test in.

Newfoundland and Labrador requires test-takers to be a Citizen of Canada to take the GED® test there.

Are there any additional province/territory requirements for me to pass my GED® test?

There aren’t any additional requirements in Newfoundland and Labrador. If you have more questions about the province’s testing program, please contact their office.

Do I need to take a class or receive instruction before I can take the test?

No, Newfoundland and Labrador doesn’t require you to prepare for the GED® test in an adult education classroom. However, studying in a classroom setting is a good opportunity to get up to speed on the topics and areas you’ll find on the GED® test.

 

Do I have to take the practice test before testing?

No, you’re not required to take the Official GED Practice Test™ before taking the test. However, the Official GED Practice Test™ is available at GEDmarketplace.com and is a good measure to see if you’re ready to take the GED® test or not.

Price & Payment (top)

How much does the GED® test on computer cost?

Newfoundland and Labrador charges $30 for the entire GED® test. That is $6 per subject-area test.

How much does it cost to retake the test? Can I retake the test for free?

In Newfoundland and Labrador, you can retake a subject for $6. Learn more about retaking the test.

Registration & Scheduling (top)

Can I take all of the parts at once or do I need to setup different appointment times?

Yes, in Newfoundland and Labrador you can take all test parts in the same day if you can find a testing center with hours that accommodate it.

What happens if I move somewhere else in the middle of testing? Can I continue my testing in my new province or do I have to start all over?

Don’t hesitate to contact the GED Administrator™ in your province with questions.

Once I start testing, is there a time limit for me to finish all five subjects before my scores begin to expire?

Yes, in Newfoundland and Labrador you’re expected to take all five subject area tests of your pencil-and-paper battery in two days of testing and then retake any failed tests at a later date that works with your schedule.

Test Scores (top)

What score do I need to pass the test?

Newfoundland and Labrador test-takers need to score a 450 on each test and 2250 on the entire test battery (all five parts combined).

Retake Policies (top)

If I don’t pass, how long do I have to wait before taking the test again?

For paper-based tests, three tests can be taken within one calendar year, but there has to be at least a 90 day period between the first and the third test. The second test can be written any time after the first test.

How much does it cost to retake the test? Can I retake the test for free?

In Newfoundland and Labrador, you can retake a subject for $6. Learn more about retaking the test.

 

Why can’t I re-test the subject that I failed?

Some provinces require people to finish taking all five subjects before being allowed to re-test in the areas that weren’t passed. In Newfoundland and Labrador, you’re required to finish the entire test before retaking on any subjects.

 

GED® Test Credential (top)

I took and passed the test but the province won’t issue my diploma. Can you help me?

Sorry to hear that you’re having trouble with your diploma. Have you contacted your local testing center or province administrator yet?

My guess is that there may be additional requirements that you need to meet. You should call your local office for more information.

Why do I need to work with my province? Can’t I just get the diploma from you?

GED Testing Service develops the GED® test and works with each province to offer the test. The credential is issued based upon rules of each individual province—most provinces have slightly different rules and regulations. Because of the province-by-province differences, GED Testing Service doesn’t issue diplomas. That’s why we encourage you to work closely with your province to get an answer.

After I start taking the exam modules, how much time do I have to complete all of them to get credentialed?

This depends on where you’re testing. In Newfoundland and Labrador you're expected to take all five subject area tests of your pencil-and-paper battery in two days of testing and then retake any failed tests at a later date that works with your schedule.

I want to order a copy of my transcript and/or diploma.

Newfoundland and Labrador issues the credential.  Your completed tests will be forwarded to the Department of Education in St. John's where they will be scored. Approximately six weeks after you write the tests, you will receive a Transcript of Test Results indicating your standard score for each test. If you are successful on all five tests, you will also receive a Newfoundlandand Labrador High School Equivalency Certificate. You will not be notified of your test results over the telephone.

What is the GED® credential in my province called?

In Newfoundland and Labrador the credential is called the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador – GED High School Equivalency Diploma.

GED® Test Language Versions (top)

Can I take my GED® test in Spanish?

No, in Newfoundland and Labrador you cannot take  the GED® test in Spanish.  

Find a local testing center.

Questions? Please contact Newfoundland and Labrador’s GED® testing office.

Can I take the GED® test in French?

Yes, in Newfoundland and Labrador you can take the computer based version and pencil-and-paper version of the GED® test in French. 

Find a local testing center.

Questions? Please contact Newfoundland and Labrador’s GED® testing office.

Am I allowed to combine different language versions of the test together?

No, Newfoundland residents aren’t allowed to combine language versions to complete the test. This means you must take all five subjects in one language to earn your GED® test credential. You will not be allowed to combine French tests with English tests or any other language version.

Questions? Please contact Newfoundland and Labrador’s GED® testing office.

Does Newfoundland and Labrador have any requirements for English as a Second Language (ESL)?

English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction can help any non-native English speaker, but there aren’t any requirements for ESL classes in Newfoundland and Labrador.